SFFA has been participating in numerous projects to support sustainable farm forestry and biodiversity. As well as many study cases were focused on carbon sequestration. Some of the SFFA projects are listed below.

The documents are available for free download to all SFFA members here

CONNECTING CONSERVATION AREAS THROUGH LINKED BIODIVERSE CARBON FORESTRY SYSTEMS. Case studies in integrated reforestation

Subtropical eastern Australia is a productive and ecologically diverse landscape that has supported a rich human culture for many millennia. However, the impacts of unsustainable land management pose a challenge to maintaining both ecological health and agricultural production. Whilst this may been seen as a major challenge for farmers, communities and governments, there are many examples of integrated and sustainable practices that can help maintain and enhance agricultural and ecological systems. This report outlines case studies that provide a range of approaches to supporting biodiversity in agricultural landscapes and enhancing degraded native vegetation on farms.


Restoration of existing native vegetation through facilitation and regeneration of local endemic species (Leigh Davison, June 2017).

This report describes the bush regeneration activities undertaken since 2007 on the Dharmananda property 6 km north of The Channon on Terania Creeksince. In 2015 we were offered support from the Biodiversity Connections Project under the auspices of the Subtropical Farm Forestry Association and Southern Cross University to assist with the work on the north facing slope.


Artificial Hollows for Wildlife. A management tool for re-connecting fragmented habitats through hollow-deficient landscapes.

Biodiversity Connections, landholders and ecologists have been working together to increase vegetation connectivity and enhance biodiversity values in rural agricultural landscapes in sub-tropical Nth NSW. In addition to re-vegetation and restoration works, roost and nest boxes were installed on a number of project sites to supplement otherwise hollow-deficient landscapes. The Biodiversity Connections Project (2012-2017) was overseen by Subtropical Farm Forestry Association and supported through funding from the Australian Government’s Clean Energy Future Biodiversity Fund Program.


CARBON ASSESSMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PLANTINGS, MIXED SPECIES FARM FORESTRY SYSTEMS, HARDWOOD PLANTATIONS AND SUBTROPICAL RAINFORESt.

The objective of this study was to undertake a carbon baseline survey to quantify the current carbon that has been sequestered in plant biomass and organic soil in the existing vegetation system corresponding to grasslands in some of the properties that are part of the project. The plant biomass in grassland comprised foliage, stem, branches and roots of plants such as grasses and small shrubs. The soil carbon was present in different forms as carbohydrates, enzymes, microbial material, nitrogenous compounds, fats, waxes, resins, organic phosphorus, sulphur compounds, humic substances, and even charcoal (from vegetation burning). The sampling was undertaken in the properties of Weather Top, Whian Whian, Gillies & Stuart, Findon Creek and O’Hare located in rural areas of Casino and Lismore in north-eastern NSW, and where environmental plantings have been established.


GROWTH, PRODUCTIVITY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND SOIL CARBON OF MIXED-SPECIES RAINFOREST PLANTATION IN AUSTRALIA.

Mixed-species plantations have multiple advantages as compared to monocultural plantations. They are gaining increased interest for their long-term species performance and carbon sequestration abilities. This study aims to assess the growth characteristic and carbon sequestration ability of a rainforest mixed-species plantation. The study was carried out at Rocky Creek Dam, in subtropical north-eastern New South Wales (NSW), Australia. The mixed-species plantation was 26 years old, and the growth of 25 rainforest species was assessed.